WHAT TO DO IF YOU HAVE A COMPLAINT

1Know the complaint
  • Take your time
  • Clarify the issues
  • Consider a resolution
 
2Read our website and FAQs  
3Try to resolve  
4Seek Further Assistance  

How to check your gas usage

Understanding how to use your meter to monitor your household gas use can be extremely beneficial, especially if you receive a bill that is higher than expected, or if you think you may have a gas leak.

You can use reads taken from your meter to estimate the cost of your next gas bill and adjust your usage accordingly, so you will not be shocked by the amount of your next bill.

Reading your gas meter requires a conversion of the read to megajoules to be enable comparison with your bill and we have prepared some easy instructions on how to do that.

How to measure your gas usage

Digital/metric gas meters (records consumption in cubic meters.)

Metric gas meter
  1. Metric gas meters are read from left to right, reading the black and white digits only.
  2. Take a meter read and note the time you have taken the read.
  3. Take a read at the same time the next day.
  4. Subtract the previous read from the current read and you will have the gas used in cubic meters.
  5. You need to convert this to megajoules by multiplying it by 38.61
    e.g. 12 cubic metres x 38.61 MJ/cubic metre = 463.32 MJ of gas.

 

Dial/clock face meter (records consumption in cubic feet.)

  1. The dials on clock meters rotate in different directions so stand directly in front of the meter.
  2. Read only the four dials closest to the left.
  3. Reading the dials from left to right, write down the number the hand is pointing to on each face.
  4. If the hand is in between two numbers, write down the lowest number – except when between 0 and 9, in which case you should write down 9.
  5. Take a read at the same time the next day.
  6. Subtract the previous read from the current read and you have the gas used in cubic feet or cubic metres (dependent on the meter).
  7. You need to convert this to megajoules by multiplying it by 1.09
    e.g. 425 cubic feet x 1.09 MJ/cubic feet = 463.25 MJ of gas.

How to measure the usage of an appliance

You will find the gas consumption listed on the appliance or in its manual.

If the listing is in joules – divide the joules by 1,000,000 to give you the Megajoules (MJ).

What is the cost to run an appliance?

Look on your gas bill to see how much you pay per unit for your gas (if you don’t have your bill 3c per MJ is a good estimate).

Make sure the figure is in megajoules (use the calculation above if necessary).

Multiply the megajoules by the unit price and you will have the running cost per hour for your appliance.

  • 15 MJ x 3c = 45c per hour.

If you run the appliance for 5 hours a day, it would cost approximately $2.25 per day to run.

  • 0.45c x 5 hours = $2.25.

If you run the appliance for 5 hours every day for the duration of your billing period, then that one appliance alone would cost you approximately $202.50 for a quarter.

  • $2.25 x 90 days = $202.50.

You can see how quickly the costs of using an appliance can add up.

If the above appliance was a gas heater being used during a cold period, even using it every second day for 5 hours (or every day for 2.5 hours) would still add approximately $100 to your bill.

We recommend you compare your bill to the same period last year for a realistic comparison.

What if you think there is a gas leak?

If you think there is a gas leak at your property you should immediately contact Australian Gas Networks on 1800 427 532.

Australian Gas Networks will be able to determine if there is leak and where the leak is located.

If the leak is on your side of the meter then the gas will need to be turned off until you have had a gas fitter attend and repair the leak.

If the leak is on Australian Gas Network's side of the meter they will arrange to fix the leak as soon as possible.

Links and further information

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